News Clips

 

Efforts to compel the United States Congress to reform the country’s “antiquated” music copyright laws were the burning issues at the 2017 edition of the ASCAP Expo, as the performing rights organization’s leadership attempted to advance causes designed to help its members earn a decent living. ASCAP President Paul Williams noted that while the group collected a record $1.059 billion in 2016 on behalf of its songwriter, composer, and music publisher members, that increase of slightly more than 6% is inadequate when measured against the number of performances, which nearly doubled, to 1 trillion…  [read more]

 

 

 

Is Stevie Wonder contemplating a run for office? The crowd gathered at Los Angeles’ Loews Hollywood Hotel for the 2017 ASCAP Expo wildly cheered the thought, which the legendary music-maker floated while sharing insights on his career and the current political scene during a speech on Saturday. “I’m practicing to become President myself,” he said while explaining his close association with the Obamas. “We’ll be building love bombs.” Wonder accepted the inaugural “key of life” award from the performing rights organization…  [read more]

 

 

 

 

 

“My ears weren’t working!” has been an artist’s rejoinder for everything from cueing the wrong playback to singing off-key. But sometimes things really do go wrong. Tiny though they may be, in-ear monitors can certainly have a huge impact on a live performance, delivering a custom audio feed directly into an artist’s head. As integral as an amp or microphone, in-ear monitors also isolate noise…  [read more] 

 

 

 

 

 

Attorneys and entrepreneurs came together to feast on a menu of big ideas, artistic ideals and red meat (rare, the way lawyers like it) at the Grammy Foundation’s 19th Annual Entertainment Law Initiative Luncheon Friday afternoon (Feb. 10) at the Beverly Hilton. The hotel’s intimate ballroom was packed to capacity…   [read more]

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the music industry is indeed in turnaround, that’s in no small part due to the digital disrupter at No. 1, the live titan at No. 3, Alexa’s mastermind at No. 12 and the visionary label bosses, tech gurus, artist managers and media moguls (including 41 first-timers!) who comprise Billboard’s annual ranking of executive excellence….  [read more]

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the final count in, Sony/ATV retained its lead with 10-plus Super Bowl synch licenses, followed by Kobalt and Universal Music Publishing Group, tied with seven, Warner/Chappell with four, and BMG three. The figures are for consumer products only, and do not include promos for TV shows or movie trailers, a sector to which most of the above had at least 2 additional songs, and in the case of Warner/Chappell, 5…  [read more]

 

 

 

 

 

Lady Gaga glams for Tiffany, Justin Bieber breaks for T-Mobile and Justin Timberlake imbibes with Bai in some of the most highly anticipated music commercials set to air during Sunday’s Super Bowl 51, which has fewer synch licenses than last year, but still sees music center stage. Lady Gaga, of course, is the main event with her halftime show and its expected audience of more than 100 million…   [read more]

 

 

 

 

Live performing isn’t what it used to be, as an increasing number of large-venue artists take advantage of digital technologies, turning stage shows into feats of engineering. While Mariah Carey’s techno-glitch on Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve made painfully clear how reliant artists — and audiences — are on the stream of data feeds that wind invisibly through a show, the honey-voiced singer is far from alone. There are few acts today that don’t utilize some form of pre-recording to improve live sound…  [read more]

 

 

 

See more of Paula Parisi’s Billboard clips here.